Books Home | Browse by Title | Order/Download Catalog | ITI Home | Privacy/Cookies  
Search
Books

Accidental Series
Directories
ASIST
American Society for Indexing
Ebooks
Blog
Plexus Publishing


Magazines

Newsletters

E-Newsletters

Conferences
Book Proposal Guidelines

Table of Contents | Sample Chapter | About the Author
Information Nation
Education and Careers in the Emerging Information Professions
By Jeffrey M. Stanton, Indira R. Guzman, and Kathryn R. Stam

About the Authors

Back to Information Nation
Order Information Nation

      


 
directory
© 1995 - , Information Today, Inc.
Information Today, Inc. • 143 Old Marlton Pike, Medford, NJ 08055-8750
Phone: 609-654-6266 • Fax: 609-654-4309 • custserv@infotoday.com
About the Authors
Jeffrey M. Stanton, PhD (University of Connecticut, 1997) is associate dean for Research and Doctoral Programs in the School of Information Studies at Syracuse University. Dr. Stanton is the coauthor, with Dr. Kathryn R. Stam, of The Visible Employee: Using Workplace Monitoring and Surveillance to Protect Information Assets—Without Compromising Employee Privacy or Trust (2009, Information Today, Inc.). In addition, Stanton has published 77 journal articles and book chapters and refereed conference papers on research topics at the crossroads of organizational behavior and technology. Dr. Stanton’s research has been supported through grants and supplements from the National Science Foundation (NSF), including NSF’s prestigious CAREER Award, as well as from the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology Research Foundation, Procter and Gamble, the National Society of Black Engineers, and the Institute of Museum and Library Services. Before starting in academia, Dr. Stanton was a software engineer in the professional audio and electronic publishing industries.

Indira R. Guzman, PhD (Syracuse University, 2006) is an associate professor of Management Information Systems and Business Administration at TUI University in Cypress, California, and senior research associate of the Information Technology Workforce (ITWF) project at Syracuse University’s School of Information Studies. Dr. Guzman holds numerous degrees, including a doctorate in information science and technology and a master’s degree in information management, both from Syracuse University, master’s and bachelor’s degrees in computer science engineering from the Polytechnic Institute of Donetsk, Ukraine, and advanced graduate studies in banking and finance from the Bolivian Catholic University, Bolivia. She received the prestigious Fulbright-LASPAU scholarship and NSF funding for her academic training as well as her research. Dr. Guzman’s business and consulting experience includes more than a decade of work as network administrator and chief of the Information Systems Department at the Argentinean Nation’s Bank and other international organizations. Her research in information studies focuses on the impact of information technologies in organizations and in society. She has also conducted research related to human resources in information systems, specifically the study of the occupational culture of information professionals; their organizational role, gender, and ethnic diversity in the field; and recruitment and retention issues. As a researcher in this field, her accomplishments include more than 30 academic presentations and publications. Her work has been published in journals such as Information Technology and People, The DATA BASE for Advances in Information Systems, Human Resource Management, Women’s Studies, Review of Management Innovation and Creativity, Journal of Digital Information, and the Latin American and Caribbean Journal of the Association of Information Systems.

Kathryn R. Stam, PhD (Syracuse University, 1999) is an assistant professor of Anthropology at the SUNY Institute of Technology in Utica, New York. She also coordinates an online graduate program in Information Design and Technology. She has taught more than 25 different courses, most of them related to anthropology; cultural diversity; or the social, organizational, and ethical aspects of information technology. She earned her PhD in social science from Syracuse University’s Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs. Following this, she completed a 3-year postdoctoral research position in the School of Information Studies at Syracuse University. Her main research interests focus on information technology, community health, cultural conservation, and ethnographic methods. She has also published a wide range of qualitative research, and her articles appear in the following journals: Information Technology and People, The DATA BASE for Advances in Information Systems, Journal of Digital Information, the Heidelberg Journal of Religions on the Internet, Computers and Security, the Journal of Information Systems Education, Surveillance and Society, Health Education Research, Social Science and Medicine, and the World Health Forum. She has received financial support for her research from the NSF and the State of New York/UUP Professional Development Committee. Her work has been presented at more than 20 professional conferences in the past six years. Her background also includes extensive experience learning, writing, and teaching about Thai and Lao culture. She worked in Thailand for more than 10 years as a translator, teacher, and program manager in the field of community health. She has completed follow-up studies of her research about married women and HIV/AIDS and has presented her work at the meetings of the American Anthropological Association and the Northeast Anthropological Association. She is currently working on a project to preserve rural Thai culture through the collection and digitization of Thai cremation volumes.